Time flies …

…when you’re slinging veggies. There’s only so much summer in Maine, and though our fall is turning out to be pretty comfortable, the trees are shedding nonetheless. I confess, it makes the old Yankee in me fatalistically sure we’ll have a long hard winter.

The view of Canada from our blackberry patch in August.

The view of Canada from our blackberry patch in August.

I didn’t realize quite how quickly time had flown since I last posted Marada’s dispatches. We all think of the summer boom in local food as being from June through August–summer vacation time. In actuality, the boom starts the first week strawberries come in, and doesn’t slack at all until after the Common Ground Fair.

So we’ve disappeared into our work, pulling late nights, introducing new drivers, brainstorming new roles for veteran staff. The month of September was gargantuan in terms of local food we moved to local people–it broke all previous Crown O’ Maine records, and we were a little wild eyed with sleep deprivation and the sheer volume of it all, filling in both of our coolers as we watched.

But, it all came in, in beautiful shape by and large, and went out in pallets stacked in ways that do my professional heart proud. Marada and I have spent alternating periods at shoveling out our desks in our respective corners of the office, scooping sand before the next wave of paperwork comes in.

The view to Canada from the top of the Valley in October.

The view to Canada from the top of the Valley in October.

Finally in October Katrina and I had enough momentum to catch our breath and rapidly restore order and sanity to the warehouse. We sorted through pallets and rearranged things on the loading docks, and the wall went up enclosing the area with the bathroom. We rearranged our belongings again, and made the plan for the next round of warehouse overhaul.

Louise has started coming in and work with us on the weekends to prepare driver notes and Monday logistics. It’s the first piece of transitioning her role here at Crown O’ Maine from Road Warrior to Logistics Queen, and it’s an exciting one.  She’ll help us to train new drivers, and she’s announced her intentions to do something about overhauling our office lunch counter too. We consider ourselves warned …

The leaves have turned, and although the weather hasn’t yet, the seasonal shift in our work is upon us. From my front corner of the office, you can begin to hear the autumn work start in the back office–the sales analysis and market projections, the evaluation of supply.  In the warehouse we start to bustle back into our winter prep and putting our (ware)house in order. We pull out our strategic planning pieces we purposely set aside in June, and we start to shift our footing for the next leap and hold on the course we’ve set out for ourselves.

Our brother Skylar, amidst the drooping wild raspberries deep in our woods.

Our brother Skylar, amidst the drooping wild raspberries deep in our woods.

I’m going to post up Marada’s dispatches that I’ve gotten behind on, and we’ll continue to breathe in the space that October brings. We all have things to do before winter, but in these Indian summer days, we eat lunch in the sunshine with leaves around our feet, and leave the warehouse to warm and starry skies.

More to follow,

Leah

Maxfield Parrish skies and the warehouse stack.

Maxfield Parrish skies and the warehouse stack.

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About crownofmainecoop

We are Maine's most innovative little food distribution business. We get Maine foods from HERE to THERE, and not just in the most literal sense...
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